Top Ten Tuesday – First Times

It’s been a pretty shit year for reading for me. There are many excuses I could list, but mostly, I just haven’t made as much time as I should have. However, I have read several new authors this year. And that is today’s Broke & Bookish Topic! These aren’t necessarily debut authors; they are simply people I’ve never read before. Some have been added to my list of authors to watch. Others probably won’t get a revisit.

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Stacey Lee – Under A Painted Sky 

I do not like historic fiction. It is not my bag. But I did not hate this book. And that puts Ms. Lee pretty high in my books.

 

 

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Top Ten Tuesday – Hey Book, Why Haven’t I Read You?

This week’s list from the Broke and Bookish is books I can’t believe I haven’t read. I’m going to concentrate on classics. There are way too many of them that I haven’t read, but that makes sense, there are a lot of damn books through history. Now, I’m not necessarily saying these are books I’m desperate to read, just ones I can’t believe I haven’t read – or didn’t have to read at some point over three years of high school and four years of an English degree. How did I get through all of those classes without one of these hitting a reading list? Also, why did I have to read all the crappy books I had to read when there are so many better choices out there.

So, here’s a list of classics I can’t believe I haven’t read.

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Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The poverty-stricken Raskolnikov, a talented student, devises a theory about extraordinary men being above the law, since in their brilliance they think “new thoughts” and so contribute to society. He then sets out to prove his theory by murdering a vile, cynical old pawnbroker and her sister. The act brings Raskolnikov into contact with his own buried conscience and with two characters — the deeply religious Sonia, who has endured great suffering, and Porfiry, the intelligent and discerning official who is charged with investigating the murder — both of whom compel Raskolnikov to feel the split in his nature. Continue reading